Home / Cookware / Choosing a Quality Induction Cookware

 

induction_cookware

If you are looking out for induction cooktops, this is one of the first things you also need to know—cookwares. The sales guy may or may not tell you so,  but yes, you definitely need a distinct set of ferromagnetic cookwares for your induction cooking. Before we go into any of the details, the simplest way to describe a ferromagnetic cookware is a cookware made of metallic material that a magnet would stick to. Most of your usual cookwares will probably not be functional on the induction cooktop. So let’s get to preparing for the new way of cooking by finding the best cookware for induction cooktop.

How to Pick Your Induction Cookware

There are two things to consider while looking for a good induction cookware that are very simple, yet crucial.

Basically, an induction cooktop operates not by applying heat directly on the cookware but rather by generating a magnetic field that induces heat on a ferromagnetic medium (cookware).

  • Check the thickness of the cookware material. Because the cookware is supposed to be heating itself up by resistant heat, consistent thickness of the cooktop material should be preferable. Well, here you see the point how even thickness of the cookware is essential for uniform heating.
  • The next important thing is to keep in mind which materials are compatible for induction cooking: Iron and iron based (steel). This can be validated by the magnet test. There are three popular options: cast iron, stainless steel, and carbon steel.

Best Cookware for Induction Cooking

Most induction cookwares in the market have non-ferromagnetic molding with iron or steel plates for the base. Non-ferromagnetic materials include non-stick Aluminum, Copper, glass, enameled porcelain, and granite wares.

However, the best induction cookwares would be those that have consistent material from top to bottom. You will notice that quality induction cookwares from brands like Duxtop or Cuisinart have a multi-layered set-up enameled with stainless steel. While Duxtop induction cookwares are relatively thin, Cuisinart has thick and heavy bottoms.

Read Also:

Buying Tips on Modern Cooktop

FAQs on Induction Cooktop

Comparison Between Thick and Thin Cookwares

  • Note that while thick bottomed cookwares heat up and cool down slow, thin cookwares heat up quickly and cool down as quickly, allowing you more agility in temperature control.
  • One of the downsides of using thick based cookwares is that food is more prone to get overcooked as it retains heat considerably long. It also takes time to get heated up but once heated it has amazing consistency.
  • Thin cookwares also have very good consistency but they heat up far more quickly and if you do not have a swift hand, quicker chances of getting out of control and having your food burned.

Well, it is the thin cookwares with which you can make the best of induction cooking but suitability actually varies with your kind of cooking.

To conclude with, Stainless steel cookwares may be a little pricey but makes for one of the most professional choices. Cast iron is the second best choice; it may wear out into a brittle state in the long run unless it is enameled with stainless steel.

 
 
 

Add a comment

required

required

optional